The Five Levels of Framing

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FATG Enhanced LogoWhat are the Five Levels of Framing? 

These are set out in the UK by the Fine Art Trade Guild and act as a framework and a set of guidelines for choosing the appropriate materials and methods suitable for framing your items.

When having something framed it is worth thinking about the standard you want the item framed to. This may not have crossed your mind, but there is a wide range of framing material available to the bespoke framer and it is our job to select the correct material for the job. While nobody is compelled to use these guidelines It does make sense for us to use them as reference when considering having something framed.
The Five Levels are:
  • Museum
  • Conservation
  • Commended
  • Budget
  • Minimum
Unless specifically asked Dragonfly Framing uses the Conservation and Commended standards.  See the end of this article for a more detailed explanation of each of the five levels.

How can these levels ensure well framed art?

Practical Examples

Recently I framed an original 1975 cinema poster, quite rare and collectable.  In consultation with the owner we chose to use the Conservation standard as the original was of considerable sentimental value and needed the best materials to ensure long term protection.
 
Another job which came in during the same week was an embroidery of a Yorkshire village to be hung at home.  The embroidery was made from a widely available pattern and so was easily reproducible at minimum cost (albeit time consuming) and although attractive, it was of limited sentimental value.  In discussion with the customer we chose to use Commended level framing for this item.
 
The 5 levels do not mean the workmanship is any different between Minimum and Museum, all the framing is done to the same high standards,  it just means that the correct techniques and materials are used appropriate to the value of the item being framed and the budget of the customer.

 

More detailed descriptions

Museum Level

Museum Level Framing is not confined to museums’ works. Some artwork gains museum-quality status over time. Works that are to be preserved for future generations, including high value items and artwork of potential or historical value should be framed to Museum Level, where possible. Processes are intended to be fully reversible up to 35 years, which means that the framed work can be returned to its former state, i.e. prior to framing, at any time, assuming that the artwork is not inherently unstable.
 
Good original frames should be retained wherever possible as these can enhance the value of the artwork. Frames can be replicated for display purposes, while the original is preserved in museum storage. Sometimes it is advantageous to retain an original window mount (possibly gilded or decorated). A qualified framer will know how to do this and protect the artwork from damage this original window mount could otherwise inflict on the artwork. Museum Level framing should give the best possible protection for your artwork or objects, whilst looking good and enabling you to view your framed work to best effect. By using the highest quality materials available and the best techniques, the framer can give your work protection from physical and mechanical damage, airborne pollution and acids generated by many framing materials. Museum Level framing should be good for at least 30 years in normal conditions. However, pictures are rarely hung in ideal conditions, so I recommend that you have the frame checked every five years or so by a professional framer. The Fine Art Trade Guild recommends that you agree a ‘condition of artwork’ report on all works to be framed to Museum Level that are not brand new, prior to framing. Appropriate remedial action on deteriorating artwork should be taken before reframing.
 

Conservation Level

Guild Conservation Level framing gives a high level of protection for your artwork or objects, whilst looking good and enabling you to view your framed work to best effect. It should give virtually as high a level of protection as Museum Level framing and in many markets, for example the USA, no distinction is made between the two. By using conservation quality materials and the best techniques, the framer can give your work protection from physical and mechanical damage, airborne pollution and acids generated by many framing materials.
 
Conservation Level framing should be good for 20 years in normal conditions, but be vigilant: pictures are rarely hung in ideal conditions, so I recommend that you have the frame checked every five years or so by a professional framer. The Fine Art Trade Guild recommends that you agree a ‘condition of artwork’ report on all works to be framed to Conservation Level that are not brand new, prior to framing.  Appropriate remedial action on deteriorating artwork should be taken before reframing. Some framers can do this work; but not all. Check and ask for credentials.
 
Objects and artworks that are to be preserved for future generations and collectables should be framed to Conservation Level, if not to Museum Level. Original artwork deserves Conservation or Museum Level Framing. Limited edition prints of moderate to high value that are not framed to Conservation or Museum Level may not hold or increase their value over time as well as those that are. This is because Conservation Level framing, as well as Museum Level framing, requires that all processes affecting the artwork be fully reversible. In other words, what you have framed to Guild Conservation Level can be returned to its former state, i.e. prior to framing, at any time up to 20 years, assuming that the artwork is not inherently unstable.
 
Good original frames should be retained wherever possible as these can enhance the value of the artwork. Frames can be replicated for display purposes, while the original is preserved in museum storage. Sometimes it is advantageous to retain an original window mount (possibly gilded or decorated). A qualified framer will know how to do this and protect the artwork from damage this original window mount could otherwise inflict on the artwork.
 

Commended Level

Guild Commended Level framing should visually enhance the artwork and will give a moderate level of protection from physical and mechanical damage, airborne pollution and acid damage. A window mount or slip should normally be used to visually enhance the artwork and distance it from the glazing. Processes do not have to be reversible so make sure your framer knows if the chance to get your work back to its condition prior to framing is important to you. The Guild recommends that processes should be reversible whenever possible, as the future value of works cannot always be foreseen and work ‘in mint condition’ commands the best secondary market value.
 
The target longevity for this level of framing is around five years in normal conditions, but this can be improved by requesting Conservation Level quality of materials, such as mount board, where you can afford it. Consult with your professional framer. Always have items and artwork that you value framed with the best possible materials; this will help them give you pleasure for longer. Commended Level framing gives you a wider choice of mount board colour options than Conservation Level and some artwork will look better when dry mounted, a process that can also help disguise previous damage but that is usually not readily reversible.
 
Commended Level Framing is suitable for replaceable artwork of limited commercial and/or moderate sentimental value and where visual appearance is important. The target lifetime assumes that artwork is not inherently unstable. Commended Level framing is not recommended for high value limited edition prints or original artwork, which should be framed to Conservation or Museum Level.
 

Budget Level

Because that is the best you can afford! It’s better than Minimum and better than readymade framing. If you can afford to frame your items or artwork at Commended Level, the Fine Art Trade Guild recommends you do so, as that gives it a degree of protection from physical and mechanical damage, airborne pollution and acid damage. Budget Level framing makes no pretense to protect the artwork or its long-term visual appearance. However, Budget Level Framing does provide a visually acceptable frame at a budget price and is suitable for replaceable art work of no commercial or sentimental value.

Minimum Level

Please, don’t do this to your pictures….
 
 

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