Framing in Black and White

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Framing in black and white

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 Interest in interior design continues to grow and art is increasingly being used to complement the colour and theme of a room’s décor.  

The correct choice of artwork and frames can add important finishing touches to the interior design of your home.  But with colours and themes going out as soon as they come in, it’s hard to know what’s hot and what’s not. 

Despite ever changing interior design trends, black and white images and photographs continue to be a popular & timeless choice.

The ability of black and white images to fit many decorating styles has contributed to its increased popularity, and customers have become more open to alternative, more sophisticated framing designs for these items.

How to best frame a black and white photograph or piece of art is often a matter of personal preference.  Most people automatically think you should go for something plain and simple, but there are many different options which can help create a much more dramatic look.  The fact is there is as much variety in black and white images as in any other art form.  Think of it this way, if we asked everyone to dress in the same way the look would suit a few but be terrible for most.  However, there are some simple rules and techniques you should keep in mind when framing black and white pieces.

 

ARQ Moulding thin     LJ Lille Moulding      The Original Collection Chantilly
LJ Confetti II Moulding   ARQ Bali Moulding   ARQ Essentials
  • Some people think a pristine white mount is best for all black and white images, on the basis that it does not detract from the picture itself.  However, for pictures with a white focal point, a pristine white mount can be too bright and will compete with the image for attention. 
  • Another common mistake is to try to ‘lighten’ dark art by surrounding it with a light mount.  In reality, a light border causes the dark colours in the image to look even darker.  
  • Mounts should be black, white or grey.  Any other colour adds an element that isn’t present in the picture.
  • When it comes to the frame, consider the era, style and location of the image.  The frame should enhance the style and mood of the picture itself.  The common perception is that you should stick to a narrow, basic frame for black and white images, but this may not co-ordinate with the subject of the picture.  For example, a picture of an ornate piece of architecture may look better with a more classical frame design. 
     Oxford thin        Oxford swept
  • Multi-core board or a mountslip which matches the frame can create a strong, classic outline around the photograph.  This helps pull the attention in from the frame to focus on the picture.     
    B W Duo2        

     

    Fillet B W2

     

Remember, just because the picture lacks colour doesn’t mean you should lack imagination.

At Dragonfly Framing, I'd be happy to offer advice and help on any of your framing requirements. 

For further information visit the studio in Bicester, book a consultation or contact me here.

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